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Welcome to the Centre for the Study of Living Standards

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151 Slater Street, Suite 710
Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5H3
CANADA
Tel: +1.613.233.8891
Fax: +1.613.233.8250
E-mail: info@csls.ca

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  The Centre for the Study of Living Standards is a non-profit, national, independent organization that seeks to contribute to a better understanding of trends in and determinants of productivity, living standards and economic and
social well-being through research.

    Announcements & Recent Releases

  • On April 6, 2016, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released a report entitled “Productivity Trends in the Canadian Transport Sector: An Overview” by Fanny McKellips and Matthew Calver. This report documents recent trends in productivity and related variables in Canada’s rail, air, trucking, and urban transit industries. Productivity growth has been quite strong in the trucking, air, and rails sectors due to technological advances, competitive pressures, deregulation, improved fuel efficiency, and capital investment. In contrast, productivity has fallen in the urban transit sector due in part to expansion of services. The report suggests several policy options to enhance transportation productivity going forward. A press release is available here.

  • On March 30, 2016, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released a new study commissioned by The Conference Board of Canada entitled "Inclusive Growth: A New Approach to Economic Evaluation of Health Policy". The CSLS has also released an extended version of the report entitled "Measuring the Appropriate Outcomes for Better Decision-Making: A Framework to Guide the Analysis of Health Policy". Many economic evaluations of health policy struggle to include the monetary and non-monetary benefits of health and issues of inequality into a single metric. This study discusses how a new “inclusive growth” approach developed by the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development can be applied to overcome this challenge when evaluating health policy. The methodology is applied to perform a decomposition of the contribution of reductions in mortality from specific causes of death to growth in the Canadian standard of living between 2000 and 2011. Based on an inclusive growth index of living standards, rising life expectancy was responsible for 40 per cent of growth in living standards over the period, while growth in income accounted for about 60 per cent. More specifically, 25 per cent of growth in the inclusive growth index of living standards was due to reduced mortality rates from cardiovascular disease and 10 per cent was due to reduced mortality rates from cancer. A press release is available here.

  • On March 17, 2016, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released a report entitled "A New Role for Cost-Benefit Analysis in Canadian Transportation Infrastructure Investment" by David Lewis and Ian Currie. The report addresses a two-part problem for the federal government in the choice of infrastructure investments over the next decade: one is the need to select projects and plans that go beyond shovel-readiness and short term job creation and contribute to long-term net economic efficiency and societal gains; the second is the need to reconcile the competing claims of multiple stakeholder groups so that infrastructure investment decisions can be both good and expeditious. A press release is available here.

  • On March 7, 2016, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released a report entitled "Explaining Industry Differences in IT Investment Per Worker Between Canada and the United States, 2002-2013" by Jasmin Thomas. In the past, attention has been focused on the aggregate ICT investment per worker gap, but 49.8 per cent of lower business sector IT investment per worker in Canada relative to the United States in 2013 was explained by two industries: information and cultural industries and professional, scientific and technical services. The main objective of this report is to shed light on the possible reasons for the gap in these sectors, including data measurement and comparability issues stemming from methodological differences between statistical agencies in Canada and the United States, and differences in potential explanatory variables of IT investment, such as human capital, taxation, profits, firm creation rates, industrial structure, and regulation, among others.

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Last Update: Wednesday, April 06, 2016 | 8