Welcome to the Centre for the Study of Living Standards

 

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111 Sparks Street, Suite 500
Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5B5
CANADA
Tel: +1.613.233.8891
Fax: +1.613.233.8250
E-mail: csls@csls.ca

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  The Centre for the Study of Living Standards is a non-profit, national, independent organization that seeks to contribute to a better understanding of trends in and determinants of productivity, living standards and economic and
social well-being through research.

    Announcements & Recent Releases

  • The Centre for the Study of Living Standards has organized four sessions for this year's Canadian Economic Association Annual Conference at St Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia Ontario from June 2 to June 4. The titles of the CSLS sessions are:
    • International Productivity Developments
    • Productivity Developments in Canada
    • Trends in Well-being in Canada
    • Investment in Children: Driver of the Future Living Standards of Canadians (Panel joint with PEF)
    A full program of the Centre's sessions can be found here. Details about the CEA 50th Annual Conference can be found on the CEA website.
  • On December 21, 2016, the CSLS released the Fall 2016 issue of the International Productivity Monitor. The issue features eight articles on a range of productivity issues: the productivity paradox in the New Digital Economy; the industry origins of Canada's weaker productivity growth; the factors behind the gap between productivity and median wage growth in Canada; a review of Robert J. Gordon's new book, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, with a response by the author; and a symposium on issues related to total factor productivity growth, including its sources, industry decompositions, and relationship to partial productivity measures, A press release is available for this issue.

  • On December 21, 2016, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released a report entitled “Decomposing Multifactor Productivity Growth in Canada by Industry and Province, 1997-2014" by Matthew Calver and Alexander Murray decompose MFP growth in Canada over the 1997-2014 period by industry and by province. Their results are methodology-dependent. The decomposition technique that includes relative price changes as contributing to aggregate MFP finds that the mining and oil and gas sector, and the provinces where this sector is concentrated, made by far the largest contribution to aggregate MFP growth because of the large increases in output prices over the period. In contrast, the technique that excludes relative price movements finds that manufacturing and Ontario (the province where manufacturing is concentrated) made the largest contribution.

  • On December 21, 2016, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released a report prepared for the Smart Prosperity Institute entitled “Partial versus Total Factor Productivity (TFP) Measures: An Assessment of their Strengths and Weaknesses” by Alexander Murray and Andrew Sharpe. The report points out that partial productivity measures provide an incomplete picture of the efficiency with which all inputs are being employed. However, TFP suffers from a number of weaknesses, including burdensome data requirements, and complex methodological choices about which there is no expert consensus. This results in a lack of transparency and difficulty for non-experts to understand. The report concludes that productivity analysts should adopt a balanced, context- appropriate approach that incorporates both types of productivity measure.

  • On December 15, 2016 the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released the report “Developing an Inclusive Innovation Agenda for Canada" prepared for Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada. An inclusive innovation system is one which opportunities to participate in innovation are broadly available to all and the dividends of innovation are broadly shared by all. The policy discussion aims to demonstrate how policies for innovation can be analyzed through the lens of economic inclusiveness without sacrificing the goal of promoting innovation and provides indicators to compare Canada's performance against peer countries and to measure progress over time. The report suggests that regulatory reforms, education initiatives and more support for growth-oriented businesses are keys to enhancing inclusive innovation in Canada. A press release is available for this report. A Globe and Mail article is also available.

  • On December 5, 2016 the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released the report “New Evidence on the Canada-US ICT Investment Gap, 1976-2014” prepared for Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada. The report finds that ICT investment in Canada has performed poorly since 2008, with nominal ICT investment per job falling from 68.4 per cent of the U.S. level in 2008 to 56.3 per cent in 2014. One half of the gap in ICT investment per job between Canada and the United States in 2014 was accounted for by the information and communication industry. Professional, scientific and technical activities, and manufacturing and wholesale and retail trade accounted for almost all of the remaining gap. A press release is available for this report. The database for this report is available here. A column in the Financial Post is also available.

  • On November 14, 2016, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released two reports on the disconnect between growth in labour productivity and median real hourly earnings in Canada and in 11 OECD countries. Canadian labour is more productive than ever before, but there is a pervasive sense among Canadians that the living standards of the 'middle class' have been stagnating. Indeed, over the 1976-2014 period, labour productivity in Canada grew by 1.1 per cent per year while median real hourly earnings grew by only 0.1 per cent per year. Rising earnings inequality, as proxied by faster growth in average wages than median wages, accounted for one half of the gap, and the declining share of labour in national income accounted for 30 per cent. Among OECD countries covered in the study the United States had by far the largest productivity/median earnings gap at 1.6 percentage points. This failure of the gains from productivity to flow to the middle class likely explains much of the angst expressed by U.S. voters during the course of the recent election. The experience should serve as a warning to governments in other countries. A press release is available for these reports. A Globe and Mail article is also available. An op-ed in the Financial Post is also available.

  • The Board of Directors of the Centre for the Study of Living Standards is pleased to announce the appointment of Don Drummond as the new chair of the organization, following the passing of Alan Nymark in May 2016. Don is one of Canada’s best known economists. He served as Senior Vice President and Chief Economist at the TD Bank from 2000 to 2010 and as Associate Deputy Minister of Finance from 2008 to 2010. He is currently the Stauffer-Dunning Fellow in Global Public Policy and Adjunct Professor at the School of Policy Studies at Queen’s University. In 2011-12, he served as Chair for the Commission on the Reform of Ontario’s Public Services.

  • On July 28, 2016, the CSLS released a report entitled The Human Development Index in Canada: Ranking the Provinces and Territories Internationally, 2000-2014 by James Uguccioni. This report provides internationally comparable estimates of the Human Development Index (HDI) for the Canadian provinces and territories from 2000 to 2014. The report explores a wide variation in the quality of life enjoyed by Canadians. It shows that while Albertans enjoy a quality of life similar to that of Switzerland or Denmark, residents of Nunavut face a quality of life similar to that of Latvia or Croatia. A press release is available for this report.

  • On July 21, 2016, the CSLS released two reports: Creating Opportunity in Inuit Nunangat: The Crisis in Inuit Education and Labour Market Outcomes by Nico Palesch and Nunavik's Labour Market and Educational Attainment Paradox by Jasmin Thomas. The first report documents the labour market, educational, and economic development outcomes of the Inuit in Inuit Nunangat by examining past and present labour market outcomes and relating them to developments in the major industries across the four regions of Inuit Nunangat. The second report explores the factors that are driving the strong labour market outcomes in Nunavik, one of the four regions of Inuit Nunangat.

  • On July 18, 2016, the CSLS released a report entitled Further Evidence on the Contribution of Services Outsourcing to the Decline in Manufacturing’s Employment Share in Canada by Matthew Calver and Evan Capeluck. This report revisits the results of an earlier CSLS report to further examine how outsourcing of work from the manufacturing sector to the services sector contributed to the recorded decline in Canadian manufacturing employment over the past four decades. Utilizing new custom data products provided by Statistics Canada, the report finds that the contribution of services outsourcing to the decline of manufacturing’s employment share was quite small, explaining no more than 8.3 per cent.

  • On July 13, 2016, the CSLS released a report entitled Trends in Low Wage Employment in Canada: Incidence, Gap and Intensity, 1997-2014 by Jasmin Thomas. Using micro-data from the Labour Force Survey, the report provides a comprehensive analysis of the trends in low-wage incidence, gap and intensity. Low wage incidence is defined as the proportion of workers aged 20 to 64 earning less than two-thirds of the median hourly wage of full-time workers. The low-wage gap reflects the depth of low-wage employment. A measure of low-wage employment is arguably most the important component of job quality because an individual’s labour market earnings largely determine their living standards. In 2014, slightly more than one in four employees aged 20 to 64 years (27.6 per cent) were considered low-wage. A press release is available for this report. A Globe and Mail article is also available.

  • On July 5, 2016, the CSLS released a report entitled Slower Economic Growth and Subjective Well-Being in the Canadian Context: A Discussion Paper by Mike Pennock from the B.C. Ministry of Health. The report investigates how slower economic growth will affect Canadian levels of well-being, arguing that the most serious threat to well-being that is associated with the slow-growth scenario is an expected increase in income inequality and household debt. Canada may be particularly vulnerable to these effects because it is entering a slow growth era with relatively high levels of inequality and household debt, relative to most other mature nations. A press release is available for this issue. A Hill Times Article is available.

  • On June 29, 2016, the CSLS released the Spring 2016 issue of the International Productivity Monitor. The issue features eight articles on a range of productivity issues: the challenges of measuring productivity in the digital economy; productivity trends and policies in Mexico; a comparison of Australian and Canadian productivity growth; productivity growth in U.S. agriculture; productivity in Canadian freight railways; global productivity growth; productivity convergence; and productivity strategies. A press release is available for this issue.

  • On June 28, 2016, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released a report entitled “Firm-level Total Factor Productivity: Canadian Freight Railways, 1986-2009" by James Uguccioni. This report estimates various productivity measures for Canadian National (CN) and Canadian Pacific (CP). Productivity growth at both railways significantly outperformed the Canadian economy throughout the period of study. Although CN's level of productivity was well below CP in the mid-1980s, it had become the leading firm by early 2000s.
  • On June 24, 2016, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released a report entitled “A Comparison of Australian and Canadian Productivity Performance: Lessons for Canada." This report examines the impact of public policy on Australia's productivity performance and discusses possible lessons for Canada from this experience. To do this, the report conducts a comprehensive analysis of the productivity performance of both countries, with particular interest in determining which underlying factors can explain Australia's superior productivity growth in recent years. In addition, the report discusses literature on the effects of public policy on Australian productivity performance since the 1990s. A press release is available here.

  • On June 1, 2016, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released two reports entitled “A Tepid Recovery: The Index of Economic Well-Being for Canada and the Provinces, 1981-2014” and “Equality and Economic Security Take a Hit: The Index of Economic Well-Being for Selected OECD Countries, 1980-2014” both authored by Jasmin Thomas and James Uguccioni. These reports document trends in economic well-being, as measured by a composite indicator developed by the CSLS. The key findings from these reports are that economic well-being in Canada, the provinces, and many other OECD countries has been slow to recover since 2008, driven by declines in equality and economic security. A press release is available here. A Global and Mail article is available here.

  • On May 15, 2016 CSLS Chair Alan Nymark passed away after a brief illness. The Board of Directors of the Centre for the Study of Living Standards extends its deepest sympathy to Alan’s family at this very difficult time. Alan’s passing is a massive loss to the CSLS. His leadership of the organization will be greatly missed. A celebration of Alan’s life will be held on Wednesday, May 18, 2016 at the Westin Hotel at 1 PM. The obituary that appeared in the Ottawa Citizen on May 17 is available here.

  • The Centre for the Study of Living Standards has organized six sessions for this year's Canadian Economic Association Annual Conference at the University of Ottawa in Ottawa, Ontario from June 3 to June 5. The titles of the CSLS sessions are:
    • Aboriginal Governance and Economic Development Issues (joint with CD Howe)
    • Full Employment in the 21st Century: Relevant Policy? Attainable Goal?" - A Mike McCracken Memorial Panel (joint with PEF and CABE)
    • Is the Canadian Labour Market Generating High-Quality Jobs? (joint with PEF)
    • Perspectives on Productivity Issues
    • Is Effective Governance Feasible for All First Nations? (joint with CD Howe)
    • Perspectives on the Measurement of Economic Well-Being
    A full program of the Centre's sessions can be found here. Details about the CEA 50th Annual Conference can be found on the CEA website.
  • On April 6, 2016, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released a report entitled “Productivity Trends in the Canadian Transport Sector: An Overview” by Fanny McKellips and Matthew Calver. This report documents recent trends in productivity and related variables in Canada’s rail, air, trucking, and urban transit industries. Productivity growth has been quite strong in the trucking, air, and rails sectors due to technological advances, competitive pressures, deregulation, improved fuel efficiency, and capital investment. In contrast, productivity has fallen in the urban transit sector due in part to expansion of services. The report suggests several policy options to enhance transportation productivity going forward. A press release is available here.

  • On March 30, 2016, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released a new st
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